Public Information Statement

March 23rd, 2019  / Author: kc9qew

NOUS43 KIND 231000 PNSIND INZ001>092-231400-
Public Information Statement National Weather Service Indianapolis IN 600 AM EDT Sat Mar 23 2019
This week has been Severe Weather Preparedness Week in Indiana. Being a Weather-Ready Nation can help reduce disaster costs, especially the loss of lives.
Preparedness and action are the keys to safety during any kind of hazard. You have learned the role of the many players that are involved before, during and after disasters.
If you do not take action during warnings or do not know the appropriate actions to take, then warnings are useless and natural hazards can become natural disasters.
You must, repeat must, plan for and respond to extreme weather events. Develop a plan, practice it, and take action for warnings or when weather threatens. Also, have handy a first aid kit, battery operated radio flashlights and fresh batteries. Post emergency telephone numbers by the phone. Everyone should know where and when to shut off utilities. Be sure to have adequate insurance and an accurate inventory of items.
If a tornado threatens, go to the lowest available floor and to an interior area such as a bathroom, hallway or closet. Have a safe area planned for each floor and each room in case there is no time to reach your safest location. If outside, try to protect yourself from flying debris. At public facilities, follow the directions of those in authority.
Mobile homes are not safe and should be abandoned long before the storm arrives. Vehicles are not safe either. Find sturdy structure Immediately or get in a ditch and cover your head with your hands.
Everyone in your family should know where to find each other after the severe weather has passed. Have a meeting place outside your home and another outside your neighborhood. Follow the assistance from authorities. Contact your insurance company if your home is damaged.
The National Weather Service works with its partners, Homeland Security, the American Red Cross, emergency responders and the media to help make sure you are prepared for many types of hazards.
The following is a summary of the role each partner plays…
National Weather Service issues official Watches and Warnings, sending these through NOAA Weather Radio to the media and public agencies. The National Weather Service disseminates storm spotter reports and provides weather safety training to anyone interested.
News media helps protect the public by broadcasting National Weather Service Warnings. They broadcast confirming information on dangerous weather conditions and carry important safety messages. The media reports on recovery efforts and provides the public with information on how to reach for help in recovery. The media educates people about severe weather and weather safety.
State and local public officials and the American Red Cross plan for and respond to extreme weather events. They relay National Weather Service Warnings through local warning systems. They facilitate recovery efforts after disasters. These public safety organizations also promote weather safety by scheduling National Weather Service Skywarn Spotter classes. They also work with community leaders, businesses and schools to ensure appropriate safety plans are in place prior to disasters.
Each year, many people are killed or seriously injured by tornadoes. Sometimes there is warning, other times there is not.
Ultimately, you will have to decide when to take action if a Warning is issued or the sky becomes threatening. It could be the most important decision of your life! So have a disaster plan in place and do practice drills to maintain it.
For up to date information on all weather, including severe weather Watches and Warnings, visit your local National Weather Service website at www.weather.gov.
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Public Information Statement

March 22nd, 2019  / Author: kc9qew

NOUS43 KIND 221000 PNSIND INZ001>092-221400-
Public Information Statement National Weather Service Indianapolis IN 600 AM EDT Fri Mar 22 2019
…BUILDING A WEATHER-READY NATION. ARE YOU READY TO HELP?…
This week is Severe Weather Preparedness Week in Indiana. Everyone has a critical role during severe weather. That role is to be prepared and respond when threatened by hazardous weather.
This ties to the vision of NOAA’s National Weather Service where we work toward building a WEATHER-READY NATION.
NOAA’s Weather-Ready Nation is about readying your community for extreme weather, water and climate events.
The devastating impacts of extreme events like violent tornadoes and widespread flooding can be reduced by taking advanced action which is why the Weather-Ready Nation initiative is so important.
What is NOAA doing to build a Weather-Ready Nation?
NOAA’s National Weather Service is transforming its operations to help America respond. Our offices now provide forecast information in a way that better supports government officials, businesses and the public to make fast and smart decisions to save lives and property and enhance livelihoods.
While we at NOAA are taking steps towards building a Weather-Ready Nation, we cannot do it alone!
What can you do to help us build a Weather-Ready Nation?
Become a Weather-Ready Nation Ambassador! Building a Weather-Ready Nation requires action from government agencies, researchers, the media, non-profits and businesses. Any organization committed to serving as an example and engaging their stakeholders to make this country ready, responsive and resilient can be an Ambassador.
Weather-Ready Nation Ambassadors can help start a dialog within our local communities that will ultimately reduce the risk of being adversely impacted by extreme weather and water events and increase community resilience, the ability to recover, for future extreme events.
Whether talking about preparedness and resilience in your home, office, at community centers, within schools or local businesses, on your website or on social media, you will be helping to spread the word, inspire others to take action, and helping our great nation become more weatherready.
On Saturday, we will review key activities tied to weather hazards and building a Weather-Ready Nation.
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Public Information Statement

March 21st, 2019  / Author: kc9qew

NOUS43 KIND 211000 PNSIND INZ001>092-211400-
Public Information Statement National Weather Service Indianapolis IN 600 AM EDT Thu Mar 21 2019
The recovery process after a natural disaster can be long and difficult. Many things need to be done by everyone. Here is a list of tasks to be accomplished.
You continue assessing your needs. Contact extended family. Contact your insurance company. Arrange financial assistance with public officials if necessary. Report your damage to the National Weather Service.
The National Weather Service continues damage assessment to note the amount of damage and cause of the damage and posts this information on their website. The damage report also becomes the official record in the National Weather Service Storm Data Publication used by insurance companies to validate claims.
The media continues broadcasts of recovery efforts providing listings of resources to turn to for help. News crews on the streets report live from damage recovery areas.
Emergency Responders continue to aid families in any recovery efforts as well as clean-up operations. Debris removal from roads and restoring communications are important functions carried out. Restoration of communications and power are accomplished as quickly as possible.
Homeland security personnel continue managing available manpower and material resources for recovery. Homeland security also begins federal assistance programs if needed.
The American Red Cross maintains volunteer operations with open shelters and provide life sustaining supplies.
On Friday, we will cover what it means to be a Weather-Ready Nation.
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Public Information Statement

March 20th, 2019  / Author: kc9qew

NOUS43 KIND 201000 PNSIND INZ001>092-201300-
Public Information Statement National Weather Service Indianapolis IN 600 AM EDT Wed Mar 20 2019
…RESPONSE ACTIVITIES DURING A DISASTER…
Knowing what to do during a disaster is important. Here are response activities that should take place during or shortly after a storm.
Your role during response is critical. Assess medical needs. Evacuate to a pre-designated meeting area if the building is damaged. Call 911 for help. Turn off gas or electricity if needed and it is safe to do so. Monitor a battery operated radio to keep informed of any emergency orders. Use your disaster safety kit if necessary.
The National Weather Service continues monitoring radar and other weather data and issue official warnings until the event has ended. Damage survey teams are dispatched to assess tornado damage. Spotters and public officials report storm damage and tornado data.
The media carry a live broadcast and text crawl of National Weather Service warnings. They also carry warnings on their web and social media sites. TV meteorologists continue to enhance details on locations threatened. News crews on the streets report live from damage areas.
Homeland Security and Emergency Responders maintain emergency operations and deploy personnel to damage areas. Medical technicians treat casualty victims and transport them to hospitals. Public officials and utility companies work to move debris, restore power and communications, and control access to damage areas. More on the homeland security role can be found at the Indiana Homeland Security website under emergency response.
The American Red Cross maintains emergency operations, opens shelters, deploys volunteers and provides life sustaining supplies to victims and emergency responders. More on the Red Cross role can be found at their website under disaster services.
Stay out of damaged buildings. Stay away from any downed power lines, treating them as if they were live. Follow directions of local authorities and return home only when they say it is safe.
Use the telephone only for emergency calls. Landline and cell towers are often overwhelmed by the volume of calls and prevent authorities from making emergency contacts. Text messaging is the most effective way to limit overwhelming cell phone communications.
Take pictures of the damage to your home and its contents. This will help you for insurance purposes.
Remember to help your neighbors who may require special assistance, especially those with infants, elderly or disabled.
On Thursday, we will cover longer term recovery from storms.
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Tornado Warning

March 19th, 2019  / Author: kc9qew

WFUS53 KIND 191415 TORIND INC005-011-013-015-021-023-027-031-035-045-055-057-059-063-065-067- 071-079-081-083-093-095-097-101-105-107-109-119-121-133-135-139-145- 153-157-159-165-167-171-191430- /T.NEW.KIND.TO.W.0012.190319T1415Z-190319T1430Z/
BULLETIN – EAS ACTIVATION REQUESTED TEST…Tornado Warning…TEST National Weather Service Indianapolis IN 1015 AM EDT TUE MAR 19 2019
…THIS MESSAGE IS FOR TEST PURPOSES ONLY…
The National Weather Service in Indianapolis has issued a
* THIS IS A TEST MESSAGE. Tornado Warning for… Hancock County in central Indiana… Monroe County in south central Indiana… Fountain County in west central Indiana… Morgan County in central Indiana… Decatur County in central Indiana… Johnson County in central Indiana… Martin County in southwestern Indiana… Marion County in central Indiana… Lawrence County in south central Indiana… Jackson County in south central Indiana… Jennings County in southeastern Indiana… Putnam County in west central Indiana… Shelby County in central Indiana… Delaware County in east central Indiana… Hendricks County in central Indiana… Sullivan County in southwestern Indiana… Bartholomew County in central Indiana… Clay County in west central Indiana… Madison County in central Indiana… Carroll County in north central Indiana… Vigo County in west central Indiana… Tippecanoe County in west central Indiana… Randolph County in east central Indiana… Rush County in central Indiana… Howard County in central Indiana… Knox County in southwestern Indiana… Parke County in west central Indiana… Owen County in west central Indiana… Boone County in central Indiana… Hamilton County in central Indiana… Tipton County in central Indiana… Vermillion County in west central Indiana… Daviess County in southwestern Indiana… Clinton County in central Indiana… Brown County in south central Indiana… Henry County in east central Indiana… Warren County in west central Indiana… Greene County in southwestern Indiana… Montgomery County in west central Indiana…
* THIS IS A TEST MESSAGE. Until 1030 AM EDT.
* THIS IS A TEST MESSAGE. No severe weather is occurring. This TEST Tornado Warning is being issued as part of Indiana Severe Weather Preparedness Week. If this were an actual warning, you would be given information about the location and path of the storm and safe actions to take.
* THIS IS A TEST MESSAGE. At this time, please review your tornado preparedness plans.
PRECAUTIONARY/PREPAREDNESS ACTIONS…
THIS IS A TEST MESSAGE. Do not take action based on this message.
&& THIS IS A TEST MESSAGE. DO NOT TAKE ACTION BASED ON THIS MESSAGE.
LAT…LON 4000 8520 3891 8545 3869 8668 3853 8668 3854 8743 3844 8773 3874 8750 3914 8766 3935 8753 4048 8751 4048 8709 4056 8709 4056 8677 4070 8676 4074 8653 4056 8637 4057 8587 4038 8586 4031 8480 4002 8481 TIME…MOT…LOC 1411Z 240DEG 49KT 3849 8763
TORNADO…RADAR INDICATED HAIL…0.00IN
$$
JEZ

Public Information Statement

March 19th, 2019  / Author: kc9qew

NOUS43 KIND 191000 PNSIND INZ001>092-191300-
Public Information Statement National Weather Service Indianapolis IN 600 AM EDT Tue Mar 19 2019
…STATEWIDE TORNADO DRILL DAY TODAY…
The statewide tornado drill is today, Tuesday, March 19. Be weather-ready and take action when the drill begins.
The National Weather Service coordinates the Statewide Tornado Drill with Indiana’s Department of Homeland Security, the Department of Education, State Police and the electronic media.
When warnings are issued, that is your cue to take action, going to a safe location. Tornado drill day is an excellent time for everyone to exercise their tornado safety plans.
Here is a look at the role of everyone in the warning process…
Your job is to take cover in pre-planned storm resistant locations. If you are responsible for others, make sure they are led to safe areas as well. Continue to monitor radio or TV sources for emergency information.
The National Weather Service monitors radar and other weather data and issues official warnings as needed. NOAA All Hazards Radio activates the Emergency Alert System, setting off alarms on NOAA weather radios, media stations, electronic devices and the internet. Skywarn weather spotters and public officials report flooding, hail and wind information and tornado positions.
The media broadcast live National Weather Service warnings. TV stations also carry text crawl messages on the bottom of the TV screen. TV meteorologists enhance detail on locations threatened. News crews on the streets report live from active weather areas. Radio stations are also important because they also break normal programming to carry warning information. Storm damage is passed along by broadcasters to help lead to sheltering response by people.
Homeland Security, law enforcement, fire departments and emergency responders maintain active emergency operations. These agencies receive storm spotter reports and deploy personnel to damage areas as needed. Tornado Warnings or reports of funnel clouds or tornadoes from designated local officials will prompt the sounding of outdoor warning sirens.
Schools will have everyone take shelter in their planned safe areas, either in interior classrooms or in school hallways on the lowest floor. Outdoor activities are suspended and everyone outside is brought to shelter. Bus drivers are trained to return to school if time allows or get children to a safe location if threatened by weather.
The American Red Cross monitors weather reports in storm safe locations. Homeland Security reports are also monitored in case activation or deployment is needed.
$$

Public Information Statement

March 19th, 2019  / Author: kc9qew

NOUS43 KIND 191300 PNSIND INZ001>092-191600-
Public information statement National Weather Service Indianapolis IN 900 AM EDT Tue Mar 19 2019
…WEATHER SAFETY RULES FOR TORNADOES AND SEVERE THUNDERSTORMS…
This week is Severe Weather Preparedness Week in Indiana. If a Tornado Warning is issued for your area, or you see a tornado approaching, do you know what to do? Did you know severe thunderstorms can be as damaging as tornadoes? Here are some safety rules to recall if severe weather threatens. Be weather-ready.
In homes, get away from windows, doors and outside walls. Go to the basement. If you have no basement, go to a first floor room at the center of the house, preferably a bathroom, hallway or closet. If possible get under heavy furniture or cover your head with blankets or pillows. Do not waste time opening windows.
In schools, follow school official’s instructions, going to the lowest floor to small interior rooms or hallways. Stay away from windows and doors. Avoid auditoriums and gymnasiums with large free span roofs that often collapse in a tornado.
In public buildings, go quickly to a designated shelter area, or to an interior hallway or small room on the lowest floor. Stay away from glass. Do not use elevators. Do not go to your car.
In factories, post a lookout. Workers should follow safety plans, moving quickly to the safest sections of the facility.
In vehicles, try and seek shelter in a strong building. If no shelter is nearby, as a last resort lie flat in the vehicle or a low lying area outside and cover your head with your arms.
Mobile homes, abandon them immediately. If there is no reinforced building or underground shelter nearby, take cover in a ditch or depression. Newer pre-manufactured homes, if anchored to a slab foundation, are nearly as safe as other stick built homes.
Large public gathering places, like ball parks, stadiums, and race tracks, follow the guidance announced by officials at the facility.
On Wednesday, see what activities take place during response to an emergency.
$$

PNSIND

March 19th, 2019  / Author: kc9qew
NOUS43 KIND 191000
PNSIND
INZ001>092-191300-

Public Information Statement
National Weather Service Indianapolis IN
600 AM EDT Tue Mar 19 2019

…STATEWIDE TORNADO DRILL DAY TODAY…

The statewide tornado drill is today, Tuesday, March 19. Be
weather-ready and take action when the drill begins.

The National Weather Service coordinates the Statewide Tornado Drill
with Indiana's Department of Homeland Security, the Department of
Education, State Police and the electronic media.

When warnings are issued, that is your cue to take action, going to
a safe location. Tornado drill day is an excellent time for everyone
to exercise their tornado safety plans.

Here is a look at the role of everyone in the warning process…

Your job is to take cover in pre-planned storm resistant locations.
If you are responsible for others, make sure they are led to safe
areas as well. Continue to monitor radio or TV sources for emergency
information.

The National Weather Service monitors radar and other weather data
and issues official warnings as needed. NOAA All Hazards Radio
activates the Emergency Alert System, setting off alarms on NOAA
weather radios, media stations, electronic devices and the internet.
Skywarn weather spotters and public officials report flooding, hail
and wind information and tornado positions.

The media broadcast live National Weather Service warnings. TV
stations also carry text crawl messages on the bottom of the TV
screen. TV meteorologists enhance detail on locations threatened.
News crews on the streets report live from active weather areas.
Radio stations are also important because they also break normal
programming to carry warning information. Storm damage is passed
along by broadcasters to help lead to sheltering response by people.

Homeland Security, law enforcement, fire departments and emergency
responders maintain active emergency operations. These agencies
receive storm spotter reports and deploy personnel to damage areas
as needed. Tornado Warnings or reports of funnel clouds or tornadoes
from designated local officials will prompt the sounding of outdoor
warning sirens.

Schools will have everyone take shelter in their planned safe
areas, either in interior classrooms or in school hallways on the
lowest floor. Outdoor activities are suspended and everyone outside
is brought to shelter. Bus drivers are trained to return to school
if time allows or get children to a safe location if threatened by
weather.

The American Red Cross monitors weather reports in storm safe
locations. Homeland Security reports are also monitored in case
activation or deployment is needed.

$$

 

Public Information Statement

March 18th, 2019  / Author: kc9qew

NOUS43 KIND 181300 PNSIND INZ001>092-181600-
Public Information Statement National Weather Service Indianapolis IN 900 AM EDT Mon Mar 18 2019
…ACTIONS TAKEN WHEN WEATHER WATCHES ARE ISSUED…
Watches for severe weather are your signal to watch the media and be prepared to take action. The National Weather Service typically issues tornado watches several hours before damaging weather occurs. Our partners in the watch process also take further preparation steps. Here is a list of actions everyone should take…
Your job is to get your Red Cross Ready Kit handy and to begin actively monitoring weather information. Review your safety plans and make sure everyone you are responsible for knows what to do should weather threaten or a weather warning is issued.
The National Weather Service Storm Prediction Center issues discussions regarding severe weather potential hours before any thunderstorms develop. They follow with a Tornado Watch or Severe Thunderstorm Watch if necessary. The local National Weather Service offices release the Watch information, activating the Emergency Alert System and alerting everyone to the increased risk of severe weather.
Television stations receive the Watch information from the National Weather Service then immediately carry live break-ins or crawl text messages on the screen. Most TV stations also increase their meteorologist staffing and begin to assemble news crews for deployment to active weather areas. Radio stations will break into normal programming and announce the Watch information on the radio.
Homeland Security, highway departments, emergency response officials, schools, medical facilities and many businesses activate emergency operations or place staffing on a high level of readiness. Schools alert staff and bus drivers to the weather threat and ensure active weather watching and warning information is monitored.
The American Red Cross alerts trained volunteers to the potential for activation and check inventory of disaster supplies.
On Tuesday, we cover what to do during Warnings.
$$

Public Information Statement

March 18th, 2019  / Author: kc9qew

NOUS43 KIND 181000 PNSIND INZ001>092-181300-
Public Information Statement National Weather Service Indianapolis IN 600 AM EDT Mon Mar 18 2018
This week is Severe Weather Preparedness week in Indiana.
Long before any warnings are issued, the National Weather Service provides long range notice of potential for severe weather. Likewise, our partners, the media, public officials and response agencies, begin preparations long before storms cause damage. Here is a list of what we all do at the outlook stage.
The National Weather Service climate prediction center provides hazard threat outlooks up to 14 days in advance. The National Weather Service Storm Prediction Center provides outlooks on severe thunderstorm potential up to eight days in advance. Local NWS weather offices issue a Hazardous Weather Outlook each day identifying weather risks in the coming week.
Weather hazard outlooks provide everyone with a long time frame to plan ahead and to check resources.
Local TV meteorologists begin broadcasting concerns for any severe weather threat days to as much as a week in advance. The meteorologists keep their news staff informed of storms that may become headline stories later in the week. The news staff then develops staffing plans for news crews that head to the streets to report on the weather as it occurs.
Homeland Security and highway departments monitor National Weather Service outlooks to determine need for hazard preparations. Should severe weather be a threat later in the week, staffing and supplies are checked for adequacy.
The American Red Cross monitors National Weather Service outlooks to determine a need for hazard preparations. Should severe weather become a possibility, staffing and supply levels are checked.
Schools, law enforcement and fire departments monitor National Weather Service Outlooks to determine their need for preparations. Staffing and supplies are again checked for adequacy.
Your job is to monitor National Weather Service outlooks to determine your need for hazard preparations. Should severe weather be a threat later in the week, check to make sure you have all the supplies you would need for an emergency. Review your safety evacuation plans to make ensure of a safe location to go should severe weather occur.
Again at the outlook stage for severe weather, it is a time frame to begin reviewing your plans and to begin paying closer attention to daily weather forecasts and the severe weather threat in particular.
On Tuesday, we will discuss actions at the warning stage.
$$